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4gI would like to share few things around LTE development in Sweden. First of all 4G has been adopted much faster than 3G. Remember that for the first years after introducing 3G, in most markets, there was hardly any data usage. Contrary to that, just like two years after the launch of LTE in Sweden, we are at the data usage level we were at with 3G at 10 years post-launch. I can clearly say we have already skipped the pre-maturity phase entirely.

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ImageI was reading my emails after a long summer vacation at my office on Tuesday and just realized a pfd attachment; Ericsson goes into data center business to be a stronger ICT player. I think this is a smart move since a lot of Telecom companies are nowadays looking into providing some IT services as well. Being a close partner to Telco players, Ericsson needed to evolve as well and they did it. Ericsson’s Data Center Build and Data Center optimization offering will meet increased demand for cloud-based services as enterprises seek to become increasingly mobile. With this offering, Ericsson enters the market for data centers and strengthens its position as an ICT player.

I liked this news and found it a very important and strategic move. I think the future is bright for evolving and developing companies such as Ericsson.

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Mobile operators celebrate! Mobile phone becomes the main device and laptop/netbook – just a larger screen and keyboard!

Future of ICT is all about mobile and mobility. Most of high-end smart-phones -such as Motorola Atrix- will soon be able to work with a docking station that provides them with a large screen and keyboard. This means your smart phone will not be only a phone anymore. That device will be your main device to access your data, applications, connections and content. This puts mobile operators in the center of ICT. Since we can provide devices, connection and the content & applications future is bright for us.

But wait a second, how do you use your mobilephone nowadays? Just for calling, SMS or surfing? What else?

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Global Data Traffic

mb-consumed-per-year

One of the interesting topics that we are discussing a lot nowadays in telecom sector is the shift from voice to data. The graph on the left shows how much data is consumed globally per year and what types of services are filling the capacity up. It is obvious that the world is going mobile and mobile video is becoming more and more important. But how can telcos charge enough for the data?

In traditional telecom world, voice is priced per-minute or per-second because that is reflective of the industry’s cost structure (and billing sophistication) about 100 years. When you had a physical copper connection between points A & B, with a human doing the switching, both capex and opex had fairly logical temporal-based components.

On the other hand, what we see with mobile data is a blend of volume, duration, use-case, location and maybe even congestion levels can be used as the basis for service pricing. As you can see the charging models for voice and data must be somehow different in my point of view. I think we telcos need to be more innovative when it comes to the bsuiness models and pricing with an increasing demand towards data.

What do you think might be a good charging model for telcos then? The fact is that the minute is fundamentally an anchor to the past, when all voice was “telephony” and all telephony was “voice”. The faster we get rid of our duration-centric obsession, the more likely we will be able to profit from The Future of Voice, before others less confined beat the telecoms industry to the punch.

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Direct Marketing: You see a gorgeous girl at a party. You go up to her and say, “I am very rich. Marry me!”

Advertising: You’re at a party with a bunch of friends and see a gorgeous girl. One of your friends goes up to her and pointing at you says, “He’s very rich. Marry him.”

Telemarketing: You see a gorgeous girl at a party. You go up to her and get her telephone number. The next day you call and say “Hi, I’m very rich. Marry me.”

Public Relations: You’re at a party and see a gorgeous girl. You get up and straighten your tie; you walk up to her and pour her a drink. You open the door for her, pick up her bag after she drops it, offer her a ride, and then say, “By the way, I’m very rich. Will you marry me?”

Brand Recognition: You’re at a party and see a gorgeous girl. She walks up to you and says, “You are very rich..”

Customer Feedback: You see a gorgeous girl at a party. You go up to her and say, “I’m rich. Marry me” She gives you a nice hard slap on your face.

Demand and Supply Gap: You see a gorgeous girl at a party. You go up to her and say, “I am very rich. Marry me!” And she introduces you to her husband

Competition: You see a gorgeous girl at a party. You go up to her and before you say, “I am very rich. Marry me!” she turns her face towards you———— she is your wife!

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Layout 1Matthew E. May is the author of In Pursuit of Elegance: Why the Best Ideas Have Something Missing and the ChangeThis manifesto called Creative Elegance. He spent nearly a decade as a close adviser to Toyota and works with creative teams and senior leaders at a number of top Fortune companies.

1. Question: How do you define elegance?

Answer: Something is elegant if it is two things at once: unusually simple and surprisingly powerful. One without the other leaves you short of elegant. And sometimes the “unusual simplicity” isn’t about what’s there, it’s about what isn’t. At first glance, elegant things seem to be missing something.

2. Question: Why is elegance so important?

Answer: Elegance cuts through the noise, captures our attention, and engages us. The point of elegance is to achieve the maximum impact with the minimum input. It’s a thoughtful, artful subtractive process focused on doing more and better with less. That’s especially important during this economic crisis when everyone is trying to move forward while consuming fewer resources. (more…)

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I am trying to find mission and vision statements for a project that I involved in. I just realized that mission-vision statement helps managers to pass the elevator test — the ability to explain the project to someone within two minutes. A good framework from Geoffrey Moore’s book Crossing the Chasm can help you to position your company or product. It follows the form:

For (target customer)
Who (statement of the need or opportunity)
The (product name) is a (product category)
That (key benefit, compelling reason to buy)
Unlike (primary competitive edge)
Our product (statement of primary differentiation)

Once you fill this form out, it will be easier for you to find your vision-mission statements.

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